3 Bold Predictions for Energy Management in 2017

At a time when renewable energy is becoming a viable alternative to fossil fuels and emerging trends are transforming enterprise energy management, the unexpected election of Donald Trump as US President only makes 2017 more uncertain for the energy world.

Consumers, the investment world, and regulatory efforts at the state and local levels have increasingly pushed businesses to show a commitment to energy efficiency and sustainability over the past few years. Meanwhile, federal policies and legislation had also been implemented to further drive progress in energy use at businesses. But the incoming administration of President-elect Donald Trump has suggested a dramatic shift in federal energy policy, sparking widespread uncertainty about how businesses should look at energy in 2017.

In a new article for Forbes, EnerNOC Senior Vice President and General Manager of Software Micah Remley laid out three predictions for enterprise energy management in light of these trends:

  1. Higher energy prices in 2017 will drive more businesses to embrace energy efficiency
  2. Renewable energy will continue to rise even if federal policies and incentives change
  3. Investors, consumers, and employees will increase pressure for corporate sustainability in the absence of federal oversight

The article goes into detail on the market factors making it likely for energy prices to climb in 2017, why coal has little hope to rebound as a significant source for energy generation, and how financial incentives for renewable energy could survive the shift in politics, among other topics.

Read the article at Forbes to get deeper insight into how these trends could shake out in 2017, and check out the strategy brief, Energy Strategy for the C-Suite, based on research from EnerNOC, PwC, and Winston Eco-Strategies, to see how businesses are adapting to these trends.

Read the strategy brief to see what goes into a successful energy strategy.
New WIndow: 

Authored By Colin Neagle

Colin is a marketing manager for EnerNOC and editor-in-chief of the EnergySMART blog.

More about the author